Review | Relatively Strange (Strange series 1) by Marilyn Messik

A captivating blend of the everyday and extraordinary

Relatively Strange by Marilyn Messik book cover

Thank you to the author for providing me with an e-copy of her book.

The blurb:

“I was five when I discovered I could fly, sixteen when I killed a man. Both events were unsettling in their own way.”

It’s hard to know what’s normal, if you’re not, and it takes Stella a while to realise she’s in the definitely ‘not’ drawer. But we are who we are and we make adjustments to fit in – most of the time – and it’s only when she finds she’s not quite as unique as she thought, that things begin to acquire a whole new dimension.

Forced to call on resources she didn’t know she possessed and thrust headlong into the violence of a situation for which nothing could have prepared her, Stella is suddenly face to face with the stark reality of medical experimentation and its horrifying consequences.

But in a world of uncertainties, one thing’s beyond doubt – this hero stuff really isn’t her. Normal, or as near as damn it, is what she wants and if that means smothering her instincts and adjusting her expectations well, so be it. At least she’ll then know should she slip off the wagon occasionally, it’ll be through choice, not chance and to suit herself. Isn’t it a fact though that just when you think you’ve got yourself sorted, life turns round and bites you?

My take:

I’m not sure I’ve ever come across such a perfect book title! And that’s possibly because I haven’t read anything quite like Relatively Strange before. I struggle to describe it, but I think the best I can do is to use a Marvel analogy (and I appreciate I may lose those of you who have no interest in superhero comics or movies, sorry!). Imagine an X-Men character with all their amazing powers, born into a “normal” London-based family in the 1950s, wrote an amusing, highly-personal memoir covering episodes from the first twenty-something years of their life. That’s close to what you get in this book, although it still doesn’t do it justice!

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