Review | Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike #3) by Robert Galbraith

Please, someone, edit these books! 3.5/5 stars.

Career of Evil Robert Galbraith

The blurb: When a mysterious package is delivered to Robin Ellacott, she is horrified to discover that it contains a woman’s severed leg.

Her boss, private detective Cormoran Strike, is less surprised but no less alarmed. There are four people from his past who he thinks could be responsible – and Strike knows that any one of them is capable of sustained and unspeakable brutality.

With the police focusing on the one suspect Strike is increasingly sure is not the perpetrator, he and Robin take matters into their own hands, and delve into the dark and twisted worlds of the other three men. But as more horrendous acts occur, time is running out for the two of them…

My take:

If you’re unfamiliar with my mixed feelings towards books 1 and 2 of this series, here are my reviews of The Cuckoo’s Calling and The Silkworm.

I’m pleased to report that there are a couple of ways in which Career of Evil is an improvement on its predecessors. With the first two books, I was irritated that the mysteries were impenetrable right until the end when we finally get some idea of what the heck is going on. This isn’t any fun for the reader because it feels like we’re being shut out rather than carried along as part of the investigative team. Thankfully, Career of Evil is much more inclusive of its readers because it begins with Strike setting out his four clear suspects and then working to eliminate/incriminate each of them. This made motive and connections between events and suspects clearer. I actually managed to figure out bits of what was going on this time!

We also get more Robin, which can never be a bad thing. And, in general, making this case personal to Strike and Robin was a good move. After 2 books we now care enough about them to be invested in their personal safety and so putting them in jeopardy is great for building tension.

But my largest issue still remains. Once again, the book is far too long. In fact, I think this book had more unnecessary length than the first two. There were whole sections I thought could have been cut to move things along more quickly without losing anything crucial in terms of plot, characterisation or drama.

So, if the next book is a snappy 400 pages or less, I think I’ll stick with the series. If only because I’m now so invested in Robin’s happiness I want to know what happens next for her. Personally, I’m still hoping Matthew – the devious little weasel – has an unfortunate accident!

Overall: this series continues to entertain and is becoming increasingly involving and inclusive of its readers. I’d still say to get them from your library though… just in case they’re not for you!


Claire Huston / Art and Soul

Save

Save

Save

Save

Advertisements

WWW Wednesday 3rd February 2016

IMG_1384-0

This meme is hosted by Sam over at Taking on a World of Words. A similar meme, This Week in Books is hosted by Lipsyy Lost and Found.

Wait! There’s more. Click to find out what I’ve been reading!

Review | The Silkworm (Cormoran Strike #2) by Robert Galbraith

A slight improvement on book 1: solid and entertaining but still overlong and overly complex. 3.5/5 stars.

The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith book cover

The blurb: When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days—as he has done before—and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home.

But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine’s disappearance than his wife realizes. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were to be published, it would ruin lives—meaning that there are a lot of people who might want him silenced.

When Quine is found brutally murdered under bizarre circumstances, it becomes a race against time to understand the motivation of a ruthless killer, a killer unlike any Strike has encountered before…

My take:

I read and reviewed Book 1 in this series – The Cuckoo’s Calling – back at the start of December and gave it 3/5 stars. As you can see, I’ve rated this second installment slightly higher, mostly because it’s mercifully free of the over-blown language which featured in the first book and irritated me by no small measure. If you missed my slightly ranty review of Book 1, you can see it here.

Otherwise, I could pretty much copy what I said about Book 1 and paste it here. To be brief:

Continue reading…

WWW Wednesday 27th January 2016

IMG_1384-0

This meme is hosted by Sam over at Taking on a World of Words. A similar meme, This Week in Books is hosted by Lipsyy Lost and Found.

Wait! There’s more. Click to find out what I’ve been reading!

WWW Wednesday 20th January 2016

IMG_1384-0

This meme is hosted by Sam over at Taking on a World of Words. A similar meme, This Week in Books is hosted by Lipsyy Lost and Found.

Wait! There’s more. Click to find out what I’ve been reading!

WWW Wednesday 9th December 2015

IMG_1384-0

This meme is hosted by Sam over at Taking on a World of Words. A similar meme, This Week in Books is hosted by Lipsyy Lost and Found.

Wait! There’s more. Click to find out what I’ve been reading!

Review | The Cuckoo’s Calling (Coroman Strike #1) by Robert Galbraith

Although a good first installment, I’ll be hoping for better things from the next two books. 3/5.

The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith aka J K Rowling book cover

The blurb: A brilliant debut mystery in a classic vein: Detective Cormoran Strike investigates a supermodel’s suicide. After losing his leg to a land mine in Afghanistan, Cormoran Strike is barely scraping by as a private investigator. Strike is down to one client, and creditors are calling. He has also just broken up with his longtime girlfriend and is living in his office.

Then John Bristow walks through his door with an amazing story: His sister, thelegendary supermodel Lula Landry, known to her friends as the Cuckoo, famously fell to her death a few months earlier. The police ruled it a suicide, but John refuses to believe that. The case plunges Strike into the world of multimillionaire beauties, rock-star boyfriends, and desperate designers, and it introduces him to every variety of pleasure, enticement, seduction, and delusion known to man.

My take:

Let’s start with the good and very good things about The Cuckoo’s Calling. The characterisation is excellent and I’d read the next book in the series just to find out what happens to Robin and whether she realizes her fiancé is clearly not right for her. As a central character, Strike not only has one of the best fictional detective names ever, but is complex, fallible, and very good at his job. The characters related to the case were a varied bunch who ranged from clueless, through annoying to downright despicable.

Continue reading…

WWW Wednesday 2nd December 2015

IMG_1384-0

This meme is hosted by Sam over at Taking on a World of Words. A similar meme, This Week in Books is hosted by Lipsyy Lost and Found.

Wait! There’s more. Click to find out what I’ve been reading!

3 Days, 3 Quotes Challenge: Day 3

A final thank you to Ashley at Dear World for tagging me to do the 3 Days, 3 Quotes Challenge/Book Tag!

The Rules:

  1. Thank the person who nominated you.
  2. Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day).
  3. Nominate three new bloggers each day.

 Quote 3: from Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling

Some (spoiler-free) context: in the last book in the HP series, Harry has been having a slightly unusual conversation with Dumbledore, who says this:

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows quote

This is one of the lines from the Harry Potter series which has stuck with me.

Nominations/tags:

  1. Love and Other Bookish Things
  2. Nola at Bookfuls
  3. Abby at The Bookish Barrister

If you’ve already been tagged, please ignore me and link me to your posts so I can check them out!

Happy reading! 🙂

 Claire Huston / Art and Soul